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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: GR/S62321/01
Title: The Epitheliome: computational modelling of epithelial tissue
Principal Investigator: Smallwood, Professor RH
Other Investigators:
Hose, Professor R Clayton, Professor RH Southgate, Professor J
Holcombe, Professor WML MacNeil, Professor S Gaizauskas, Professor R
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
University of Auckland
Department: Computer Science
Organisation: University of Sheffield
Scheme: Standard Research (Pre-FEC)
Starts: 01 January 2005 Ends: 31 December 2009 Value (£): 1,596,474
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Cells Complexity Science
Theoretical biology
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Healthcare Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology
Related Grants:
GR/S62338/01 GR/S62345/01
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
Predictive modelling of the interaction of individual cells has received little attention. Cells self-assemble into fully-differentiated tissue. This building of functional structures from autonomous cells is central to human biology, from embryology, growth, cell turnover, to wound repair and the development of malignancy. Cell biology, molecular biology, genomics, proteomics are providing, in a qualitative, reductive manner, the data to answer these questions. To understand the mechanisms in a predictive manner requires the integration of this data through computational models. Epithelial tissues are relatively simple but nevertheless exhibit a number of very important clinical problems (e.g. wound healing and the development of malignancy), and there are good biological models for data input and validation. Cell adhesion is the organising theme - in the development of normal structure; motility in wound repair and malignancy; mechano-transduction and cell signalling. This is a `Grand Challenge' project which aims to integrate computational and biological models of the social behaviour of cells within epithelial tissue. The aim is to develop a computational model of cell behaviour within the context of tissue architecture, differentiation, wound repair and malignancy. The over-arching vision is to establish the UK as the leader in computational modelling of cellular interactions.
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Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.shef.ac.uk