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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/R042861/1
Title: SpectroMicroscopy and Spin at the Single Chemical Bond Limit
Principal Investigator: Moriarty, Professor PJ
Other Investigators:
Corner, Professor J Wadley, Dr P Rushforth, Dr AW
Beton, Professor PH Edmonds, Dr K Gallagher, Professor B L
Saywell, Dr A Champness, Professor NR Fromhold, Professor TM
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Sch of Physics & Astronomy
Organisation: University of Nottingham
Scheme: Standard Research
Starts: 01 September 2018 Ends: 31 August 2023 Value (£): 1,127,563
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Condensed Matter Physics Magnetism/Magnetic Phenomena
Materials Characterisation Quantum Fluids & Solids
Surfaces & Interfaces
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
No relevance to Underpinning Sectors
Related Grants:
Panel History:
Panel DatePanel NameOutcome
13 Mar 2018 EPSRC Strategic Equipment Interview Panel March 2018 Announced
Summary on Grant Application Form
A great deal of 21st century science is driven by our ability to see, move, and probe individual atoms and molecules. Indeed, the state of the art is no longer observing single atoms; instead, we are now at the point where single chemical bonds can be "seen" (and manipulated on a bond-by-bond basis in some systems).

The technique that has enabled this remarkable ability to explore the sub-microscopic world of atoms, molecules and quantum particles is the scanning probe microscope (SPM). An SPM is a microscope like no other; no lenses, no mirrors, or no optics of any type are used to generate an image. Instead, a sharp probe (nowadays often terminated in a single molecule) is moved within a few atomic diameters of a surface, rastered back and forth, and the interaction between the probe used to generate an image. That interaction can span a range of physical forces and phenomena, and thus a scanning probe microscope can be sensitive to a plethora of different sample properties.

This project focuses on securing state-of-the-art scanning probe facilities for the UK's nanoscience community. If we do not continually strive to achieve ever more precise and challenging measurements, science will stagnate. The drive to push the limits and capabilities of scientific techniques underpins very many advances in understanding and technology.

We will install and commission a high magnetic field scanning probe microscope which combines measurements of atomic structure, chemical forces, electronic properties, and magnetic behaviour in a single instrument. This will be the first instrument of its type in the UK and it will enable a wide range of exciting experiments probing a broad set of materials exhibiting novel phenomena. As another first, we will establish an innovative public engagement programme by which members of the public will be able to gain access to control of certain features of the instrument to carry out their own atomic imaging and manipulation experiments.
Key Findings
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Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk