EPSRC logo

Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/R021422/1
Title: Quantitative arithmetic geometry
Principal Investigator: Loughran, Dr DT
Other Investigators:
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Mathematics
Organisation: University of Manchester, The
Scheme: First Grant - Revised 2009
Starts: 01 April 2018 Ends: 31 March 2020 Value (£): 98,480
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Algebra & Geometry
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
No relevance to Underpinning Sectors
Related Grants:
Panel History:
Panel DatePanel NameOutcome
29 Nov 2017 EPSRC Mathematical Sciences Prioritisation Panel November 2017 Announced
Summary on Grant Application Form
A Diophantine equation is a polynomial equation where one is interested in finding solutions in the whole numbers. Mathematicians have been fascinated by such equations since antiquity. Often simple to state problems require very difficult tools to solve (one of the most famous examples of this being Andrew Wiles's celebrated proof of Fermat's last theorem). Moreover such equations, whilst originally viewed as nothing but a curiosity, have found important applications in modern times to information security and cryptography.

Given a Diophantine equation, a fundamental problem is to determine whether a solution actually exists. This problem in itself is very difficult. Things get even more interesting if one has a *family* of Diophantine equations (given by varying the coefficients of the equations, say). In this case one would like to understand the distribution of equations in the family with a solution. This is a very popular modern topic, with Manjul Bhargava being awarded the Fields Medal in 2014 for his work on such problems (this is a kind of mathematician's version of the Nobel prize).

The project concerns problems of this type. Here there is a conjecture due to Jean-Pierre Serre, a famous French mathematician, on the distribution of Diophantine equations in certain families with a solution (namely plane conics). We will answer some cases of Serre's problem, as well as extending Serre's original framework to more general problems.

A famous theorem of Erdos and Kac also states that a "random" integer n has approximately log log n prime factors (in a precise probabilistic sense). We will obtain analogues of this probabilistic result in the setting of families of Diophantine equations, where we ask for the number of primes p for which a given equation is not soluble modulo p.
Key Findings
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Potential use in non-academic contexts
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Impacts
Description This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Summary
Date Materialised
Sectors submitted by the Researcher
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Project URL:  
Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.man.ac.uk