EPSRC logo

Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/P027989/1
Title: Oxidation-sensitive nanomaterials for treatment of immune diseases
Principal Investigator: Spain, Dr SG
Other Investigators:
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Chemistry
Organisation: University of Sheffield
Scheme: First Grant - Revised 2009
Starts: 01 May 2017 Ends: 30 April 2019 Value (£): 83,528
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Drug Formulation & Delivery Materials Characterisation
Materials Synthesis & Growth
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
No relevance to Underpinning Sectors
Related Grants:
Panel History:
Panel DatePanel NameOutcome
07 Mar 2017 EPSRC Physical Sciences - March 2017 Announced
Summary on Grant Application Form
We generally consider our immune system as our protector, destroying germs and preventing an infection from killing us. However, when the immune system works incorrectly it can cause diseases itself (autoimmune diseases) including asthma, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Additionally, as our understanding of immunology has improved we have found that the immune system is involved in many more diseases that previously thought including cancer, stroke and even physical injuries.

Many of these diseases cannot be cured and are chronic and degenerative, with each occurrence of symptoms resulting in further damage. To prevent flare ups and minimise further damage we treat patients continually whether needed or not, often resulting in severe side effects from the drugs. Ideally, a patient would take their medicine each day and it would do nothing unless needed. In the event of disease progression, a drug would be released treating the symptoms and minimising disease progression. At the same a visual signal, e.g. a change in urine colour, would alert the patient to the elevated disease state allowing them to take additional medication or contact a doctor.

Here we aim to develop a range of new materials that can act as carriers for drugs. Under normal, "healthy", conditions these carriers will circulate for a few hours/days before being excreted harmlessly via urine/faeces. On exposure to the disease environment they will respond by releasing a drug capable of treating the targeted disease.
Key Findings
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Potential use in non-academic contexts
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Impacts
Description This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Summary
Date Materialised
Sectors submitted by the Researcher
This information can now be found on Gateway to Research (GtR) http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk
Project URL:  
Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.shef.ac.uk