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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/P02744X/1
Title: Light-controlled manufacturing of semiconductor structures: a platform for next generation processing of photonic devices
Principal Investigator: Skabara, Professor PJ
Other Investigators:
Edwards, Dr PR Watson, Dr I Martin, Professor RW
Dawson, Professor MD
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Pure and Applied Chemistry
Organisation: University of Strathclyde
Scheme: Platform Grants
Starts: 01 April 2017 Ends: 31 March 2021 Value (£): 1,288,118
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Manufacturing Machine & Plant Optical Devices & Subsystems
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Manufacturing Electronics
Related Grants:
Panel History:
Panel DatePanel NameOutcome
23 Feb 2017 Future Manufacturing Platform Grants (S) Announced
Summary on Grant Application Form
This Platform Grant (PG) will apply our internationally-leading expertise in structured illumination and hybrid inorganic/organic semiconductor optoelectronic devices to create new opportunities in the rapidly developing field of light-controlled manufacturing. Structured illumination fields can in principle be obtained from both inorganic (GaN) and organic LEDs, implemented on a macroscale via relay optics, or demagnified to a microscale. Novel manufacturing with photopolymerisable materials can firstly involve use of structured illumination as a novel means to control motorised stages. This technique can be combined with pattern-programmable UV excitation for mask-free photolithographic patterning, continuous photo-curing over larger fields, localised photochemical deposition, or other forms of photo-labile assembly. Process variants can also be envisaged in which arbitrarily positioned fluorescent objects or markers are 'hunted', and then subject to beam excitation for photocuring or targeted photoexcitation. This method could be used, for example, to immobilise individual colloidal quantum dots for use as emitters in quantum technology applications. Multifunctional devices with sensing ability, such as organic lasers for explosives detection, represent another excellent example of automated devices operating under remote conditions. Further examples of the envisaged uses of this technology include:

[1] LED microdisplay asset tags for management of high-value objects (artworks, nuclear fuel containers).

[2] Passive asset tags containing unique micro-patterns of fluorescent objects (eg. colloidal quantum dots, organic macromolecules) for higher-volume, anti-counterfeiting applications.

[3] Customisable continuous-flow micro-reactors for fine chemical manufacturing.

[4] Energy harvesting micro-modules to power other autonomous microsystems, where we will focus on organic PV and ambient-radiation (RF) approaches.

Key Findings
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Potential use in non-academic contexts
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Summary
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Organisation Website: http://www.strath.ac.uk