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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/P021921/1
Title: Research Institute in Verified Trustworthy Software Systems (VeTSS)
Principal Investigator: Gardner, Professor P
Other Investigators:
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Dept of Computing
Organisation: Imperial College London
Scheme: Standard Research
Starts: 01 March 2017 Ends: 28 February 2022 Value (£): 654,850
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Fundamentals of Computing Software Engineering
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Information Technologies
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
Modern software systems comprise components constructed by many parties, ranging from individual open-source developers to companies and government organisations spanning the globe. They are written in multiple, complex languages, depend on the correctness of sophisticated third-party libraries, exploit concurrency and distribution to handle vast data sets, and are developed according to new software design processes that advocate frequent source code updates. Traditional methods for ensuring software reliability are inadequate in this modern context: modern companies move fast, leaving little time for code analysis and testing; traditional testing methods do not work well with concurrent and distributed programs; and the reluctance of users to update mobile apps renders the deployment of software fixes ineffective. Scalable techniques that can provide trust, in the deep technical sense of analysis and verification, are vital not only to support safe software, but also to give stability to this international software infrastructure.

The purpose of this new Research Institute in Verified Trustworthy Software Systems (RIVeTSS) is to bring together and support world-class UK academics and industrialists in systems, security and verification, unified by a common interest in program analysis and verification, at the forefront of research developments in fundamental theories and industrial-strength tools, targeting real-world applications. Such analysis of program behaviour is of critical importance to proper management of the rapid evolution of modern software systems
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Organisation Website: http://www.imperial.ac.uk