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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/L016702/1
Title: EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Plastic Electronic Materials
Principal Investigator: Kim, Professor J
Other Investigators:
Heeney, Professor MJ Herz, Professor LM Dunn, Professor SC
Stingelin, Professor N
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Advent Technologies Inc BASF Cambridge Display Technology Ltd (CDT)
Centre for Process Innovation Limited Climate KIC UK CSEM Brasil
CSIRO De La Rue Ecole Nationale
Erlangen-Nuremberg, University of ETH Zurich ETRI
Flexink Ltd. KAIST Kurt J Lesker Co Ltd
Max Planck Institutes (Grouped) Molecular Vision NANOforce Technology Ltd
National Physical Laboratory NREL (Nat Renewable Energy Laboratory) NSG Group (UK)
Oxford Photovoltaics Limited (Oxford PV) Plastic Logic Ltd PragmatIC Printing Ltd
Seoul National University Solvay (International Chemical Group) Tata Steel
The Linde Group The Solar Press UK Ltd. UK Centre for Materials Education
University of California Santa Barbara Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating
Department: Dept of Physics
Organisation: Imperial College London
Scheme: Centre for Doctoral Training
Starts: 01 April 2014 Ends: 30 September 2022 Value (£): 4,145,262
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
Materials Synthesis & Growth
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Electronics
Related Grants:
Panel History:
Panel DatePanel NameOutcome
23 Oct 2013 EPSRC CDT 2013 Interviews Panel P Announced
Summary on Grant Application Form
Plastic Electronics embodies an approach to future electronics in their broadest sense (including electronic, optoelectronic and photonic structures, devices and systems) that combines the low temperature, versatile manufacturing attributes of plastics with the functional properties of semiconductors and metals. At its heart is the development, processing and application of advanced materials encompassing molecular electronic materials, low temperature processed metals, metal oxides and novel hybrids. As such it constitutes a challenging and far-ranging training ground in tune with the needs of a wide spectrum of industry and academia alike.

The general area is widely recognised as a rapidly developing platform technology with the potential to impact on multiple application sectors, including displays, signage and lighting, large area electronics, energy generation and storage, logistics, advertising and brand security, distributed sensing and medical devices. The field is a growth area, nationally and globally and the booming organic (AMOLED) display and printed electronics industries have been leading the way, with the emerging opportunities in the photonics area - i.e. innovative solid-state lighting, solar (photovoltaics), energy storage and management now following.

The world-leading, agenda-setting UK academic PE research, much of it sponsored by EPSRC, offers enormous potential that is critical for the development and growth of this UK technology sector. PE scientists are greatly in demand: both upstream for materials, process and equipment development; and downstream for device fabrication and wide-ranging applications innovation. Although this potential is recognised by UK government and industry, PE makes a major contribution to the Advanced Materials theme identified in Science Minister David Willet's 'eight great technologies', growth is severely limited by the shortage of trained scientists and engineers capable of carrying ideas forward to application. This is confirmed by industry experts who argue that a comprehensive training programme is essential to deliver the workforce of scientists and engineers needed to create a sustainable UK PE Industry.

The aim of the PE-CDT is to provide necessary training to develop highly skilled scientists and engineers, capable both of leading development and of contributing growth in a variety of aspects; materials-focused innovation, translation and manufacturing. The CDT brings together three leading academic teams in the PE area: the Imperial groups, with expertise in the synthesis, materials processing, characterisation, photonics and device physics, the Oxford team with expertise in ultrafast spectroscopes probes, meso and nano-structured composites, vacuum processing and up scaling as well as the material scientists and polymer technologists at QMUL. This compact consortium encompasses all the disciplines relevant to PE, including materials physics, optoelectronics, physical chemistry, device engineering and modelling, design, synthesis and processing as well as relevant industrial experience. The programme captures the essentially multidisciplinary nature of PE combining the low temperature, versatile manufacturing attributes of plastics with the functional properties of semiconductors and metals. Yet, to meet the needs of the PE industry, it also puts in place a deep understanding of basic science along with a strong emphasis on professional skills and promoting interdisciplinary learning of high quality, ranging across all areas of plastic electronics.

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Organisation Website: http://www.imperial.ac.uk