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Details of Grant 

EPSRC Reference: EP/C532759/1
Title: High throughput electrophysiological, electromagnetic & electromechanical cardiac virtual tissue engineering
Principal Investigator: Holden, Professor A
Other Investigators:
Clayton, Professor RH
Researcher Co-Investigators:
Project Partners:
Department: Institute of Membrane & Systems Biology
Organisation: University of Leeds
Scheme: Standard Research (Pre-FEC)
Starts: 01 October 2005 Ends: 30 September 2009 Value (£): 92,311
EPSRC Research Topic Classifications:
High Performance Computing Medical science & disease
EPSRC Industrial Sector Classifications:
Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology Healthcare
Related Grants:
Panel History:  
Summary on Grant Application Form
A major cause of death is due to electrical irregularity in the heart, leading to loss of its function as a rhythmic pump. This is produced by abnormal spread or propagation of electrical excitation in the tissues of the heart, caused by changes in either or both cell behaviour and Cell--cell coupling overthe past 40 years detailed experiments on single cardiac cells have provided a description of the molecular and cellular mechanisms d c details and the excitation, but how these lead to abnormalities in propagation in the tissue and organ behaviour is still uncertain. The problem lies in the details and the complexity: computational simulation provides a means for solving this. Current models of cardiac activity require about a week of a 1.5 multi processor supercomputer to stimulate a few seconds of activity. Although these simulations have been validated by comparison with experimental improvements in hardware and also by improvements in programming.This project is to train a computational scientist in these problems, in a laboratory actively engaged in several funded projects related to the mechanisms generating the normal heart rythm, the control of heart rate and rythm by drugs, the onset of disorders in heart rythm and the effects of large magnetic fields in triggering disorders in rythm, of large electrical fields on eliminating disorders in rythm defibrillation. These different specific problems provide testbed for evaluating improvements in computational techniques. We expect this project will lead to increased computational efficiency for solving this kind of problem, and that this will enable new approaches to understanding the prevention and control of these potentially fatal arrhythmias.
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Further Information:  
Organisation Website: http://www.leeds.ac.uk